Archives For social media

Congratulations, you and your company have done it. You have your own Facebook page and Twitter stream. How hard was that now? How do you feel, and what are you expecting to gain. Now that you’ve caught up to the times, here are some things you may want to think about before investing too much more time, money, and energy in this endeavour, because chances are that your company should ditch Facebook, Twitter and Co.

“What is this guy talking about?” you’re probably thinking. “Why would we do that after everything that we’ve invested already?” Here’s my answer to these questions.

Let’s get started

social_media_explained_donuts

From Xplornet

First of all let’s look at the purpose of social media. Social media was initially created to connect people using the internet. Sure we were already connected via e-mail and chat rooms, but generally the internet was and is a repository for information. Individuals, companies, and organizations can load information onto the web, where it can be found thanks to search engines like Google, Yahoo, Microsoft, and Co. This content and search function was to be paid for by online advertising. Social media was supposed to be, well… social, and connect individuals to engage in conversations. However, already at an early stage social media started to become a public stream of consciousness. With so many messages showing up in any average user’s stream(s), trying to get heard has become a shouting match, and unfortunately much of what is being shouted lacks any importance, it’s like the below scene from Anchorman, where Brick, played by Steve Carell, best sums up the intelligence and importance of what many are saying.

The Story Continues

Continuing on with our history: Companies were obviously quick to adopt social media into their marketing. Being social, meeting the customer where they’re comfortable, and metrics were the lucrative claims that sold business decision makers. Your advertising could go viral for next to nothing. People would market for you. The promise was akin to actually being able to track and quantify word-of-mouth advertising.

The easiest thing to measure are Likes on Facebook, and followers on Twitter, views on YouTube, and +1s on Google+. So everyone went looking for them, but how do you get people to like your page? Well either people like your brand or you need to attract them. Attracting them usually revolves around giveaway campaigns. These campaigns do a great job attracting those looking for free stuff, but they are not evangelists. These are not people who spread the word about a product, and some companies have realized this like Burger King in Norway

Of course your interactions will generally climb as a percentage the fewer followers you have. Liking is too easy and doesn’t actually say or do anything other than potentially give Facebook & Co. an insight into your interests, though even here there is the difference between saying and doing. And when we see how many things are posted on social media without any background research (a simple googling of a term or event*), it’s quite probable that even with Big Data, the picture companies get of us isn’t entirely correct. As Crisis Relief Singapore points out in a poignant ad – liking isn’t helping:

crisis_relief_flood

Deceiving Metrics

And while some companies have figured out that the number of likes isn’t important, here is further case for how much damage all your likes might be causing your brand on Facebook.

And for users of Twitter, a recent article in the New York times shows that the trending metrics might not really be important at all, as what’s trending is either trending with people who already love your brand. Think about any time Apple launches a new product. Or people who either dislike your brand, or are customers you don’t really want. Think about the irrational, anti-Coca Cola tweets after their Super Bowl commercial this year.

Digibabble and the importance of real conversations

For many companies, and yours might be one of them, social media has become pushing mechanism. Deals, sales, and new products and services are highlighted on a continual basis. And when you’re not pushing profit generating products and services you’re chasing likes through often meaningless pictures and banter like “Guess where this picture was taken,” or “Congratulations to So-and-So for winning the Oscar for Film XYZ” both of which have little to do with what you actually do. All of this culminated in a cacophony of meaningless digibabble as Y&R Global CEO David Sable calls it. Furthermore, when fans actually interact with your page, interaction fails. Dialogue requires a flowing exchange of ideas. Questions and answers do not count as dialogues. Read Plato and you have a long discussion, not simply Socrates posing the question “What is justice?” and a simple answer that “Justice means living up to your legal obligations and being honest” and then ten people liking the answer. Often this is not your social media team’s fault, but rather a lack of resources. Know that when you open yourself up to conversations you need to be open to both compliments and ridicule, and you best have answers to questions. This is why Apple Computers doesn’t bother engaging in Social Media. Sure they’ve claimed their sites, but they don’t post anything, because it doesn’t align with their philosophy. If you have a question, a Genius in the Apple Store will gladly help you during your pre-arranged appointment. An example of a company doing it wrong, or showing that a social team needs quick, accurate answers to questions is Lufthansa.

My friend Gerrit has Senator Status with Lufthansa. Recently he wanted to fly from Munich to the US. Arriving at the airport he was told that his reserved seat had been given away. When he asked to speak to someone he received no help, nor did he receive financial compensation for needing to spend another day in Munich. As no one at the airport would help, and he was told to file a complaint in a letter via the post. Not happy with this resolution, he posted a message on Lufthansa’s Facebook page. The answer he received here too was a link to the complaints part of the Lufthansa website where the same information was posted. To say the least he was not happy, and Lufthansa may have lost a loyal customer. Not that social media is to blame, but it didn’t help, and it didn’t help because the company is not set up to deal with customer complaints in real time. Otherwise if you check out the Lufthansa Facebook page, they do a pretty good job of answering questions, but as it’s all in a stream it’s hard for people to follow the information or find it.

Social Media needs to be human

Social media means opening yourself up for a conversation, and in some ways a cross examination. It has the opportunity to create transparency for your company, but if you’re not ready for that, you best stay away.

Companies that have done a good job of using social media so far are small firms let be entrepreneurs and small teams that want to interact with their customers and potential customers. I’m a 50% stakeholder in a small language school in Zurich, and we care what people say and ask, we also try to answer messages and comments within 12 hours and love dialogue with people learning German and English. Dialogue however is rare, as it takes a concerted effort to write a comment and actually engage with a page, “liking” is a simple click, and is why it means almost nothing. Have we received more students from our Facebook and Twitter work? No. Do we push on it? Yes, we push our blog – information for German learners. Do we push sales? No, because people don’t want to be sold to on social media. We also try to share interesting articles and information relevant to our followers and our community. We’re not social media gurus, but we’re human and people get genuine human interaction on our page, and that’s why they like it. If you can give your social media team autonomy and the ability to answer questions, comments, and concerns with authority, and let them interact with users in a friendly and personal way, social media might help you create better connections to your customers and potential customers. If that’s not the case, shut down your social media sites, and stay focused on your product, customer satisfaction, and your other marketing strategy. And equally important, remember how many people you can have a conversation with. I guarantee 100,000 is too many.

*One of my favourites is the picture of the wave height after the tsunami near Japan in 2011, which floats around as the radiation in the ocean.

Mark Twain

Mark Twain

Running clears my head and is one of the activities during which many ideas come to mind. As I was running today I was thinking about Mark Twain and social media.

Mark Twain once wrote that if you want to drive a young man insane, have him keep a journal for a year. When I was 21 I tried and I faltered, but before that I was going mad trying to come up with things to write about. A journal is a private thing and perhaps this was my issue, perhaps it’s a man thing or perhaps even human, but knowing that no one should really be reading your journal while you live, you try to write meaningful things that might say something positive to your children or grandchildren when you’re no longer around. Of course this doesn’t have to be the case, but so it was with me and I think many others.

Then blogs and Facebook came along and we’ve all started keeping a journal. Many of us make entries more than once a day. From how we’re feeling, to what we’re reading, to well thought out observations and arguments. But it’s all there and being stored somewhere. Why are we writing more than ever before? Surely we do not possess a broader vocabulary than our parents, nor are we more refined masters of grammar. Do we have more opinions and observations than past generations? There may be some arguments for this, but I have another hypothesis.

We write more today than ever before because we have an audience. Writing in your journal for future generations is completely different from writing for a potential public of a billion people. Now there may be a great many other observations, such as the idea that we write things that we used to tell people when we used to speak to our friends and family in person and not just digitally. I, however, believe that it all comes back to the Aristotelean idea of humans being social creatures. The internet is just society when we want it, but it is social. That said, I think humans are performers. Much of what we do, we do for others, especially when there is recognition.

So there we have it, that’s what I was thinking about while running today. I think that this post proves at least for myself, that my theory has some validity.